Monthly Archives: February 2018

Empingham

Sunday 25 February 2018. It is just 5 weeks since my heart attack and an enforced period of rest has resulted in a loss of overall fitness and a consequential gain in weight. It is time to do something about it and a 7.5 mile recce on Wednesday of Josephine’s upcoming walk from Ashwicken saw my return to more serious walking. I have to say that I was tired by the end of it and fell asleep soon after getting home.

Today’s 8.5 mile walk with 565ft of ascent starting in Empingham was another step, well nearly 23,000 steps, in the right direction. Linda S had volunteered to lead this walk for me but I felt up to doing it myself, albeit at a slightly slower pace. There were 12 of us out today; 8 from Fenland and 4 guests from other groups. We headed north and across a couple of muddy fields before picking up a firmer grassy track to Fort Henry where we stopped for coffee. It was a beautifully sunny day and out quite warm out of the breeze.

A familiar track then took us into Exton where, along the way, we saw the first new-borne lambs of the season. A short walk through the village of Exton then took us to more field-edge paths and the Whitwell area on the shores of Rutland Water where we stopped for lunch. From here it was just a couple of miles on the shore-side path to the end of the dam wall and back into Empingham.

Empingham – walk route

Aerial View

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Roman Camp, West Runton

Sunday 18 February 2018. Only Josephine and Karen joined Phil on what turned out to be a lovely walk in glorious sunshine. We started at Beacon Hill, the highest point in Norfolk at 338 feet (103 metres), also known as Roman Camp.

We walked south, crossing fields, arriving at Felbrigg Hall for a magnificent coffee stop. We then turned north on the Weavers Way, over the railway, and on into Cromer and Cromer Pier for lunch, where we found two newish benches at the end of the pier, sheltered and in sunshine for an unhurried lunch.

The tide was going out so we walked along the beach to East Runton Gap, making our way south through the village, away from the tourist route, and through delightful different pathways, ascending back to Beacon Hill through rhododendron woods.

A lovely walk of 8.75 miles with a wonderful variety of scenery.

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While the 3 Musketeers were enjoying themselves at the coast, I continued my return to walking with a couple of local outings. On Friday I took myself off to Ferry Meadows for a quick 3.5 mile walk. Today was a cold and misty start but it didn’t deter me from going for a 4.6 mile walk in Fineshade Woods. Starting from Duddington, I made my way to the cafe at Top Lodge which serves just the best cappuccino. It might seem like a long way to go for a coffee but it got me out into the fresh air and helped to rebuild my stamina. My plan is to do an 8-miler on Tuesday in preparation for leading my Empingham walk next Sunday. (Brian)

Apethorpe

Nine Fenland members and two members from Peterborough met outside the church in the little conservation village of Apethorpe for Josephine’s 6.5 mile walk.
Many of the limestone cottages and houses are grade II listed. The village is recorded in the Domesday Book and was, for many years, the seat of the Earls of Westmoreland. Apethorpe Palace is situated at the southern edge of the village.

We followed undulating field paths, spotting deer in the distance, to King’s Cliffe, passing a mill house with mill race and up to the church, where we found a bench by Willow Brook, a tributary of the River Nene,
We then made our way out of the village and under a tunnel of the disused railway, skirting the perimeter track of the abandoned RAF King’s Cliffe with it’s buildings in ruins. We sat on one of the walls for lunch. It was cold and so we didn’t linger.
We made our way to the Glenn Miller memorial where he played his last airfield band concert in the big hangar at Kings Cliffe, long since disappeared.
A nice path led through woodland and we were back in Apethorpe.
Everyone behaved themselves, so we didn’t need to make use of the stocks opposite the church!