Brownsham & Clovelly

Thursday 15 May. The purpose of today’s walk was to visit the picturesque fishing village of Clovelly but as there appeared to be an admission charge of £6.75 each we wondered if there was a way of gaining access without stumping up what seemed to be an exorbitant charge. The walk route suggested starting from the NT car park at Brownsham but before we got there, there was the little matter of negotiating narrow country lanes to get to a local tea shop. We came upon a tractor and trailer and had to reverse for him to squeeze by. Tea and a toasted tea cake came as a welcome pick-me-up prior to starting the walk a little later in the day than planned.

A very pleasant woodland walk brought down to the SWCP just above Clovelly. It seems that the admission charge is collected in the car park and as we bypassed this by arriving on foot we were able to gain access to the village without paying. In retrospect it is one of very few places where the offer was worth the price. The first thing that we saw was two of the donkeys used to carry goods down the steep cobbled street that leads down to the harbour.

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The next set of pictures show just how pretty Clovelly is.

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The walk down the cobbled streets of Clovelly saw us lose 370ft in height and of course, this had to be regained on the way back up. We opted to use the tarmac access road which runs down the back of Clovelly but this still had some incredibly steep gradients. Leaving Clovelly, we picked up the SWCP to head back to Brownsham. This unusual structure called The Angel’s Wings provided a welcome and shaded rest spot.

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There were great views along the way which included Blackchurch Rock and Mouthmill Beach where we stopped for a rest and to enjoy the warm sunshine.

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Leaving the sea shore once more, we had another steep climb of over 300ft which then provided a view across to the island of Lundy.

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The walk turned out to be 7 miles but with an amazing total of 2,600ft of ascent. It seemed tough and the stats back this up.

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