Monthly Archives: May 2014

Sheringham

Sunday 26 May. As it was a long drive to Sheringham and a long walk, I wondered how many people would turn out today. The number fluctuated through the walk. We set out with 10 and a dog but Josephine had to leave us after a couple of miles at West Runton and Hilary joined us at East Runton for the last 5 miles or so. The walk was advertised as being either 7.5 miles or 9.5 miles, depending upon where you looked, but I cut a section out and compromised at 8.6 miles with a total ascent of 840ft. Looking at the route profile at the end of this post you might be fooled into thinking that we had climbed a mountain. In reality this was just 330 from sea level to the highest point in Norfolk at Beacon Hill (338ft). On my recent Devon holiday I was climbing 2 or 3 times as much for most of the time.

The walk was planned to coincide with low tide so that we could walk on the beach as far as East Runton.

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The cliffs along this section of the walk seemed to have been badly eroded by the winter storms.

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We left the beach at East Runton where Hilary joined us for the climb for lunch at Beacon Hill and the remainder of the walk. In profile the climb looks steep but it was only 300ft or so spread over a couple of miles. Our route took us along new paths for the group around the side of Incleborough Hill and up the access road for the Camping & Caravan Club’s East Runton site. After lunch we made our way along level woodland tracks to the viewpoint at Beeston Regis Heath. From here we could see across to Beeston Bump and the Sheringham Shoal wind farm.

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It was largely downhill from Beeston Regis Heath until we came to Beeston Bump. Some chose to make this final climb whilst others decided to detour around the side. On our way back to the cars and for a welcome ice cream, we passed the converted public toilet which is now called the “Wee Place”.

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I didn’t take many pictures today and the majority of those used in this post have been very kindly provided by Helen.

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North Devon Holiday

Friday 23 May. If you’ve been following the blog for the last couple of weeks, you’re probably bored with reading about what a good time I had on my latest holiday. As is usual, I like to add up how much walking I’ve done on each holiday. This time it was almost 60 miles with over 16,000ft of ascent. Coastal walking in North Devon isn’t easy although Amanda managed a paddle on Croyde Bay. This picture of Lee Bay was the first that I took during the holiday and probably my favourite.

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Arlington Court

Tuesday 20 May. The weather forecast wasn’t too promising so instead of walking I made a visit to the nearby NT property at Arlington Court. The house was once owned by the Chichester family of whom Sir Francis is a distant relative. The National Collection of Carriages is also housed here. The house wasn’t anything special but the carriages were interesting especially that of The Speaker of the House of Commons. Pictures were prohibited so if you want to see it you’ll have to follow the link.

I’m posting this a day late as I’ve just about exhausted the 1gb monthly data allowance on my phone and I’m using the Jockey Club’s free wi-fi at Cheltenham racecourse. I’ve started my journey home a day earlier than planned as it is a bank holiday weekend coming up and I want to get my satellite TV system sorted before my next trip in 10 days time. I’ve just remembered that 20 May is the 9th anniversary of my retirement.

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Bull Point & Morte Point

Monday 19 May. A thunder storm woke me at 2am today so I was a little surprised that my energy and enthusiasm for walking was rekindle after a leisurely Sunday. I still didn’t feel like travelling far for a walk so I decided to repeat the walk that I did last Sunday. The route was only marginally different and the views were much the same so I didn’t stop to take any more pictures. Leaving my caravan at 8:45 I set off downhill to Bull Point and along the SWCP as far as Morte Point. It was a warm sunny morning and I was a little surprised that I had the SWCP all to myself. I called in at the village shop in Morthoe to get a pastie for lunch. The walk was finished by 11:15 and this was good timing as 5 minutes later it started to rain heavily. The route was 6.25 miles with 1,500ft of ascent.

Combe Martin

Sunday 18 May. Back to solo walking and I didn’t feel like doing much today. I drove to Combe Martin with the intention of walking some of the SWCP. I only managed a mile and a half with a total of 570ft of ascent before calling it a day. The path out of Combe Martin is close to the A399 and isn’t particularly attractive. I hope that the weather lasts until tomorrow when I might feel like tackling something a little more demanding.

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Ilfracombe & Hele Bay

Saturday 15 May. It was Amanda & Josephine’s last day with me so we opted for a more leisurely sightseeing walk starting from just outside Ilfracombe. We walked down to the harbour for coffee and to view the Damien Hirst statue “Verity”.

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Leaving the harbour behind us we had a steep climb to the top of Hillsborough, an iron age fort, from where we had great views back to Ilfracombe and ahead to Hele Bay where we stopped for lunch.

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Whilst the walk was only 3.4 miles, we still managed a total ascent of just over 1,100ft.

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Foreland Point

Friday 16 May. It has been a hard weeks walking and Amanda decided to take the day off. I didn’t feel like doing too much either so we made our way to just outside Lynmouth which would take in Foreland Point. The route was just over 5 miles and with almost 2,000ft of ascent – so not as easy as I thought. Starting from near Countisbury we made our way to join the SWCP. The track was narrow in places with a drop of 900ft down to the sea. From here we had good views across to Lynmouth & Lynton.

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The SWCP bypasses Foreland Point but there is a goat track which goes right around the edge that is only recommended for anyone who doesn’t mind some exposure. We opted for the middle course which gave us good views from a safe vantage point. On the way up we met a couple of Exmoor ponies and their foals.

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This was the view from our coffee stop on Foreland Point.

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There was long descent off Foreland Point and, of course, a long climb to follow and rejoin the SWCP. It seems that everywhere that we have been this week we have seen bluebells and today was no different.

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Looking back we had a good view of Foreland Point.

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After a couple of miles of woodland walking on the SWCP, it was time to head back to the car and yet another 400ft climb.

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